Headquarters
United States Army, Europe, and Seventh Army
United States Army Installation Management Agency
    Europe Region Office
Heidelberg, Germany

Army in Europe
Regulation 385-55*

13 February 2006

Safety

Prevention of Motor-Vehicle Accidents


*This regulation supersedes USAREUR Regulation 385-55, 26 January 2000.



For the CG, USAREUR/7A:

E. PEARSON
Colonel, GS
Deputy Chief of Staff

Official:

GARY C. MILLER
Regional Chief Information
    Officer - Europe



Summary. This regulation prescribes motor vehicle safety policy for the Army in Europe.

Applicability. This regulation applies to military and civilian personnel and their family members in the European theater.

Supplementation. Organizations will not supplement this regulation without USAREUR G1 (AEAGA-S) approval.

Forms. This regulation prescribes AE Form 385-55A. AE and higher level forms are available through the Army in Europe Publishing System (AEPUBS).

Records Management. Records created as a result of processes prescribed by this regulation must be identified, maintained, and disposed of according to AR 25-400-2. Record titles and descriptions are available on the Army Records Information Management System website at https://www.arims.army.mil.

Suggested Improvements. The proponent of this regulation is the USAREUR G1 (AEAGA-S, DSN 370-7751/8124). Users may suggest improvements to this regulation by sending DA Form 2028 to the USAREUR G1 (AEAGA-S), Unit 29351, APO AE 09014-9351.

Distribution. B (AEPUBS).



CONTENTS


CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION


CHAPTER 2
RESPONSIBILITIES


CHAPTER 3
PREVENTION OF ARMY MOTOR-VEHICLE ACCIDENTS


CHAPTER 4
POV ACCIDENTS


Appendixes
A. References
B. Senior-Occupant Responsibilities
C. Motor Vehicle Accident-Prevention Measures
D. Winter Driving Orientation
E. Special Achievement Awards for Safe Driving
F. Tracked-Vehicle Safety
G. Criteria for Built-Up Vehicles
H. Inclement Weather Road-Condition Status Policy
I. Army in Europe Military-Vehicle Conspicuity Program

Figures
D-1. Suggested Outline for WDO
E-1. Summary of Awards
I-1. MVD Description and Mounting Instructions

Tables
H-1. Road-Condition Status Characteristics
I-1. Ordering Information

Glossary



CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION


1-1. PURPOSE
This regulation—


1-2. REFERENCES
Appendix A lists references.


1-3. EXPLANATION OF ABBREVIATIONS
The glossary defines abbreviations.


1-4. REGULATION MAINTENANCE
The USAREUR G1 (AEAGA-S) is responsible for maintaining this regulation.


1-5. OBJECTIVES


1-6. FUNDING
Commanders will program funds to implement this regulation into annual budget requests.


CHAPTER 2
RESPONSIBILITIES


2-1. COMMANDERS
Commanders at all levels will—


2-2. GARRISON COMMANDERS
Garrison commanders will conduct driver orientation for POV and AMV license applicants as a prerequisite to driver testing and licensing. U.S. Forces driver testing station personnel will not accept applications from Soldiers, U.S. civilian employees, or family members without proof they attended driver orientation.


2-3. DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF, G1, USAREUR
The Deputy Chief of Staff, G1, USAREUR, will—


CHAPTER 3
PREVENTION OF ARMY MOTOR-VEHICLE ACCIDENTS


SECTION I
SAFE DRIVER BEHAVIOR


3-1. GENERAL
Accidents waste resources and hinder mission accomplishment. Commanders will establish and conduct aggressive motor-vehicle safety programs at all levels to prevent loss of personnel and equipment. Appendix C provides motor vehicle accident-prevention measures.


3-2. DRIVER SELECTION


3-3. DRIVER TRAINING


3-4. INVESTIGATING AND REPORTING ACCIDENTS


3-5. MOTIVATING SAFE PERFORMANCE


3-6. SAFE DRIVING


SECTION II
VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS


3-7. GENERAL


3-8. MOTOR-VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS


SECTION III
ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND ROAD CONDITIONS


3-9. ADVERSE ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS


3-10. TRAFFIC-CONTROL DEVICES
Commanders will comply with uniform traffic-control devices (for example, stoplights) used by their host nation. The standards for host-nation traffic devices are located at the garrison safety office and facility engineer office.


SECTION IV
SAFE VEHICLE OPERATIONS


3-11. FIRE PREVENTION
The following guidelines are precautions against AMV fires:


3-12. PREVENTING ASPHYXIATION


3-13. CONVOY OPERATIONS


3-14. SAFETY EQUIPMENT


3-15. MOVEMENT OF PERSONNEL


3-16. TACTICAL-VEHICLE OPERATIONS


3-17. EMERGENCY SERVICES: BREAKDOWN AND ACCIDENT-SITE CONTROL
Commanders will ensure procedures are in place to—


3-18. MOTOR-VEHICLE OPERATIONS NEAR AIRCRAFT
The flightline safety officer or airfield manager will—


3-19. USE OF GROUND GUIDES FOR MANEUVERING NONTACTICAL AND TACTICAL WHEELED, TRACKED, AND ENGINEER VEHICLES

NOTE: In emergencies where a ground guide is not available (for example, outside of the military installation), drivers of tactical and nontactical wheeled vehicles will—

NOTE: Ground guides will not position themselves between the vehicle being guided and another object where an inadvertent engine surge or momentary loss of vehicle control could cause injury or death. Drivers of vehicles will stop their vehicles immediately if they lose sight of a ground guide or note that the guide is dangerously positioned between the vehicle and another object. Drivers of vehicles in such cases will secure their vehicle, dismount, and make an on-the-spot correction before continuing operations.


CHAPTER 4
POV ACCIDENTS


4-1. GENERAL


4-2. POV ACCIDENT PREVENTION
Most Army personnel killed or injured in POV accidents in Europe are involved in single-vehicle accidents at night on secondary roads. Factors contributing to accidents are often the use of alcohol or drugs, excessive speed, failure to use a restraint system, or fatigue. Commanders will identify other factors in accidents that apply to their communities or units and will implement POV accident-prevention programs using these factors. Programs must include the following:

 

APPENDIX A
REFERENCES


SECTION I
PUBLICATIONS

AR 25-400-2, The Army Records Information Management System (ARIMS)

AR 385-40, Accident Reporting and Records

AR 385-55, Prevention of Motor Vehicle Accidents

AR 600-8-22, Military Awards

AR 600-55, The Army Driver and Operator Standardization Program (Selection, Training, Testing, and Licensing)

AR 672-20, Incentive Awards

AR 672-74, Army Accident Prevention Awards Program

AR 750-10, Army Modification Program

DA Pamphlet 40-501, Hearing Conservation Program

DA Pamphlet 738-751, Functional Users Manual for the Army Maintenance Management System— Aviation (TAMMS-A)

FM 9-20, Technical Escort Operations

FM 10-67-1, Concepts and Equipment of Petroleum Operations

FM 21-60, Visual Signals

FM 21-305, Manual for the Wheeled Vehicle Driver

FM 55-30, Army Motor Transport Units and Operations

Training Circular 21-306, Tracked Combat Vehicle Training

AE Regulation 10-5, HQ USAREUR/7A and Select Commands

AE Regulation 55-1, United States Army Motor Vehicle Operations on Public Roads

AE Regulation 55-4, Safe Movement of Hazardous Goods by Surface Modes

AE Regulation 190-1/USNAVEUR Instruction 11240.6P/USAFE Instruction 31-202, Registering and Operating Privately Owned Motor Vehicles in Germany

AE Regulation 600-55, Driver- and Operator-Standardization Program

AE Pamphlet 190-34/USAFE Pamphlet 31-206, Drivers Handbook and Examination Manual for Germany

AE Pamphlet 385-15, Leader’s Operational Accident-Prevention Guide

AE Pamphlet 385-15-1, Commander’s Convoy Checklist and Risk Assessment


SECTION II
FORMS

SF 91, Motor Vehicle Accident Report

OF 346, U.S. Government Motor Vehicle Operator’s Identification Card

DA Form 348, Equipment Operator’s Qualification Record (Except Aircraft)

DA Form 1256, Incentive Award Nomination and Approval

DA Form 2028, Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms

AE Form 190-1F, U.S. Forces Certificate of License/The United States Forces in Germany

AE Form 385-55A, Certificate of Merit for Safety

 

APPENDIX B
SENIOR-OCCUPANT RESPONSIBILITIES


B-1. PURPOSE
This appendix explains the responsibilities of the senior occupant of military vehicles. The senior occupant of a military vehicle may be the operator or a passenger.


B-2. RESPONSIBILITIES


B-3. LIABILITY
If the senior occupant of a military vehicle fails to provide adequate supervision, he or she may be subject to disciplinary action and monetary liability for vehicle damage.

 

APPENDIX C
MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENT-PREVENTION MEASURES


C-1. PURPOSE
This appendix describes motor vehicle accident-prevention measures and suggests several ways for unit commanders and assigned personnel to publicize safety programs.


C-2. CREATING INTEREST


C-3. EDUCATION PROGRAMS


C-4. INCENTIVES AND AWARD PROGRAMS


C-5. OTHER ACTIONS


C-6. ACCIDENTS
If a unit military vehicle has been involved in an accident—

 

APPENDIX D
WINTER DRIVING ORIENTATION


D-1. PURPOSE
This appendix provides guidance for conducting winter driving orientation (WDO).


D-2. GENERAL


D-3. INTERMEDIATE TRAINING OBJECTIVES
There are no intermediate training objectives.


D-4. ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS


D-5. SEQUENCE OF EVENTS


D-6. SAFETY RESTRICTIONS
There are no safety restrictions.


D-7. ADDITIONAL COMMENTS AND INFORMATION
The instructor will annotate the operator’s OF 346 and DA Form 348 with a stamp or with the statement “Winter Driving Orientation, (Year)” to indicate training was received.


 

Subject Discussion
 
1. Introduction a. Army in Europe accident statistics show an increase in motor vehicle accidents during winter months.
b. Winter brings bad weather and hazardous driving conditions (for example, fewer daylight hours, fog, ice, rain, snow).
c. Compensating for winter weather hazards.
 
2. Driver and
Supervisor
Responsibilities
   
a. If road conditions are unsatisfactory, reconsider the need for the trip.
b. If the trip is essential, consider transportation other than an AMV or POV.
c. The driver must be well rested and not have consumed alcoholic beverages 8 hours before driving or while driving.
d. The driver and passengers will wear seatbelts.
e. The driver will use techniques to compensate for other drivers and for weather and road conditions.
 
3. Driver
Attitude and
Preparation
a. Drivers should refresh their memories about past winter-driving experiences.
b. Get the feel of the road. Try the brakes occasionally or gently depress the accelerator while driving. Rising temperatures increase the slipperiness of ice and snow. Drivers should adjust speed accordingly.
c. See and be seen. Do not be a “peephole” driver. Make sure all lights and windows are clean.
d. Increase following distance. Winter surfaces require stopping distances 3 to 12 times longer than dry surfaces. Trucks require longer stopping distances than smaller vehicles.
 
4. Winterizing
Cars
For safe winter driving, a vehicle must be in excellent mechanical condition.
a. Brakes. Brakes must be properly adjusted and inspected before the winter season.
b. Tires. Winter tires should be mounted before the first snowfall. Unevenly worn tires may result in skids. Each tire should have an even tread of the required amount. Tires should be inflated to the proper pressure; low pressure may increase the tendency of the vehicle to skid or slide.
c. Tire Chains.
    (1) Tire chains offer increased traction, reduced stopping distance, more protection from skids than any other device, and a general feeling of security.
    (2) The life and performance of tire chains are improved by proper application. Twice the mileage may be obtained by applying them snugly according to mounting instructions.
d. Windshield Wipers. Wiper blades should operate with enough pressure to remove rain, sleet, and snow from the windshield without streaking. The windshield spray bottle should be full and protected from freezing.
e. Lights. Headlights should be adjusted properly. Lights, mirrors, and reflectors must function and be as clean as possible.
f. Heater and Defroster. This equipment must be able to keep the windshield and windows clear.
g. Muffler and Exhaust System. These systems must be free from leaks to protect against carbon monoxide poisoning. Running vehicle engines in confined spaces or sitting in closed, parked cars with the engine running can be fatal. Always ensure fresh air enters the passenger compartment while the engine is operating.
h. Antifreeze. The cooling system should be flushed, all connections tightened, and antifreeze added. The radiator and hoses should be checked for leaks.
i. Winter Tuneup. A winter tuneup is essential for cold-weather starting and preventing stalls.
j. Battery. The battery must be in excellent condition (properly charged, cells filled, terminals clean and tight, free from cracks and corrosion).
 
5. Typical Road
Condition and
Safe Driving
Tips
a. Accidents may not be blamed solely on the weather. The driver can usually avoid getting into trouble.
b. The driver should not let winter clothing interfere with driving ability.
c. Too many people may crowd into the warm cab of an AMV. Limit the number of riders to ensure the driver has enough room to operate the vehicle controls.
d. Check fuel, oil, and coolant levels before starting on a trip. Keep the gas tank at least half full to prevent condensation and freezing of the gasline.
e. Call ahead to your destination to check road conditions before starting on a trip outside your area.
f. Many highway surfaces are dangerous, even when cleared of ice and snow. Patches of ice may form on elevated road surfaces at freezing or near freezing temperatures. Icy patches may remain on shaded sections of the roadway long after the open roadway is dry and clear.
g. Glare ice forms easily on expressways where gently graded surfaces allow only slow runoff of water. Acceleration, deceleration, or even a slight turn can make a car go out of control. Drivers who find unexpected icy patches on roadways should maintain a constant speed and avoid braking, accelerating, or turning, when possible.
h. Steering and braking require great care on slippery surfaces. Change direction slowly and smoothly. When the pavement is slippery because of frost, ice, snow, or wet leaves, a quick turn of the steering wheel may result in a skid. Approach a turn at reduced speed and turn the wheel as gradually as possible.
i. The broad lanes, gradual curves, and relatively mild grades of European expressways (autobahns, autostradas) do not lessen the chance of skids and crashes on slippery road surfaces. Speed reduction is important. Adverse road conditions can lead to emergency situations on high-speed roads.
 
6. Skids and
Skid Control
a. Skids result from sliding or spinning wheels and centrifugal force acting on the vehicle when driving into a curve. Steer in the direction of the rear-wheel skid, but only enough to correct the skid and put the vehicle back on course. Overcorrections result in “fishtailing.”
b. Front-end skids can result from locked wheels or a highly crowned road pavement. Front-end skids can often be corrected by releasing the brakes and letting the front wheels roll to regain traction and steering control.
c. Prevention is the best cure for skids. Reduce speed before shifting to a lower gear, since the shift in weight on the wheels can lead to a skid. Slow down before entering a curve, maintain a constant speed within the curve, and accelerate only at the exit of the curve.
d. Practicing skid recovery in a safe area is also a good accident-prevention method, but only with a qualified instructor under controlled conditions.

 

Figure D-1. Suggested Outline for WDO

 

APPENDIX E
SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS FOR SAFE DRIVING


E-1. PURPOSE
This appendix provides policy and procedures for unit-level special achievement awards (SAAs) for safe driving.


E-2. APPLICABILITY
This appendix applies to any Department of the Army civilian (DAC) or local national (LN) employee in the Army in Europe who—


E-3. GENERAL


E-4. AWARD CRITERIA


Awards Criteria
$3 per 1,000 milesAdditional safe-driving mileage may be awarded each year in cash increments of not less than $25 after the required accident-free base is attained.
Additional $1.50 per 1,000 miles
(total of $4.50 per 1,000 miles)
Awarded for the following complex vehicle operations after the required accident-free base is attained.
    a. Heavy truck (5-ton or more).
    b. Multiaxle vehicle (three or more axles) or any type of trailer.
    c. Bus with nine or more passengers (including schoolbuses).
    d. Dangerous cargo (for example, ammunition, explosives, flammables).
    e. Emergency vehicle (for example, ambulance, firetruck).
Additional $1.50 per 1,000 miles
(total of $6 per 1,000 miles)
Awarded for a continuous record between 110,000 and 510,000 consecutive miles of accident-free driving, including the required accident-free base.
Bonuses Criteria
Additional $3 per 1,000 miles
(total of $9 per 1,000 miles)
Awarded for continuous record of accident-free driving over 510,000 consecutive miles, including the required accident-free base.
$200 bonus and plaque presented by the
commander of a major subordinate command
Awarded to each driver who drives 500,000 continuous accident-free miles.
$500 bonus and trophy presented by the
CG, USAREUR/7A
Awarded to each driver who drives 1 million continuous accident-free miles.

Figure E-1. Summary of Awards


E-5. SPECIAL AWARDS


E-6. NOMINATION FOR CASH AWARDS


E-7. CERTIFICATE OF MERIT FOR SAFETY
AE Form 385-55A may be awarded to any company-size unit (including battery, troop, headquarters and headquarters detachment) that successfully completes a fiscal year (FY) without a Soldier convicted of, or administratively determined to have been, driving while intoxicated (DWI) or driving under the influence (DUI) of intoxicating beverages or drugs.

 

APPENDIX F
TRACKED-VEHICLE SAFETY


F-1. PURPOSE
This appendix provides safety guidelines for operating tracked vehicles.


F-2. SAFETY GUIDELINES
Tracked vehicles must be operated as follows:


F-3. TRAINING NEW DRIVERS


F-4. TRACKED-VEHICLE LIGHTS AND MARKINGS
Tracked vehicles operating singly (with escort) or in a convoy on public roads in Germany must be—

 

APPENDIX G
CRITERIA FOR BUILT-UP VEHICLES


G-1. PURPOSE
This appendix establishes criteria for constructing and using built-up vehicles.


G-2. POLICY
Built-up vehicles may be used only to secure, store, and transport high-value items, repair parts, supplies, and tools. Only the following vehicles may be built up:


G-3. CONSTRUCTION


G-4. USE

 

APPENDIX H
INCLEMENT WEATHER ROAD-CONDITION STATUS POLICY


SECTION I
ROAD CONDITION STANDARDS


H-1. GREEN
Unrestricted vehicle dispatches are authorized. Ideal road, temperature, and visibility conditions exist. Drivers will observe normal precautions and speed limits (table H-1).


Table H-1
Road-Condition Status Characteristics
Road
Condition
Road
Surface
Snow Ice Snow Depth Visibility Temperature
GreenDryNone or
blowing powder
NoneNoneMore than 164 ft
(50 m)
Above 35 °F (+2 °C)
AmberWet*Packed
*Slush
*Patches
*Black ice
*Slush
*Less than
4 in (10 cm)
*Between 65.5-164 ft (20-50 m)Between 30 °F (-1 °C)
and 35 °F (+2 °C)
Red*Flooded*Drifting*Sheet ice*Between
4-8 in (10-20 cm)
*Between 50-65.5 ft
(15-20 m)
Between 10 °F (-12 °C)
and 30 °F (-1 °C)
Black*Heavily
flooded
*Heavy drifting*Extreme
sheet ice
*More than
8 in (20 cm)
*Less than 50 ft (15 m)Less than 10 °F (-12 °C)
*When one or more of the road conditions marked with an asterisk are noted, the corresponding road-condition status must be declared.


H-2. AMBER
Ideal road, temperature, and visibility conditions do not exist (table H-1). If a road condition marked with an asterisk in the Amber category is reported, commanders (para 3-9) will declare Amber road conditions. Increased driving times, hazardous road conditions, and driver experience must be considered in dispatching vehicles under Amber conditions. Under Amber conditions, unit commanders (captains and above) may authorize dispatches for their vehicles and garrison directors of public works (DPWs) or primary staff (S1, S2, S3, and S4) may authorize their vehicle dispatches.


H-3. RED
Only mission-essential and emergency-essential vehicle dispatches are authorized. Road, temperature, and visibility conditions are equal to or worse than those noted in table H-1. If one or more of the conditions marked with an asterisk in the Red category are reported, commanders (para 3-9) will declare road conditions Red. The dispatch record for mission- and emergency-essential vehicles must be marked “mission- and emergency-essential.” Garrison commanders and battalion-level commanders may authorize dispatches of mission-essential vehicles. DPWs and chiefs of building and grounds and operation maintenance may approve mission-essential dispatches during Red road conditions to provide emergency support and for snow and ice removal. A risk assessment must be completed before dispatch.

NOTE: Drivers of military vehicles passing through areas that have declared Red road conditions should contact their chain of command and evaluate the risk of continuing the mission. Weather and road conditions must be part of all mission risk-management decisions.


H-4. BLACK
Only emergency-essential vehicle dispatches are authorized. Road, temperature, and visibility conditions are equal to or worse than those noted in table H-1. If one or more of the conditions marked with an asterisk in the Black category are reported, commanders (para 3-9) must declare road conditions Black. The dispatch record for emergency-essential vehicles (for example, ambulances, emergency engineer, fire, police) must be marked “emergency-essential.” Chiefs of appropriate offices (for example, DPW, fire, medical activity, provost marshal) may authorize dispatches of emergency vehicles. Garrison and brigade-level commanders and above may authorize dispatches of their emergency vehicles. A risk assessment must be completed before dispatch.

NOTE: Drivers of military vehicles passing through garrisons that have declared Black road conditions should contact their chain of command and evaluate the risk of continuing the mission. Weather and road conditions must be part of all mission risk-management decisions.


SECTION II
WEATHER AND ROAD CONDITION DEFINITIONS


H-5. ROAD SURFACES


H-6. SNOW


H-7. ICE


H-8. SNOW DEPTH
Snow depth should be measured in areas of the road not affected by the clearing or drifting actions of the wind.


H-9. VISIBILITY
Fog, haze, heavy rain, or heavy snow can affect a driver’s range of vision. Choice of a condition status in table H-1 depends on a driver’s ability to distinguish objects clearly (such as obstructions, parked vehicles, pedestrians, road-edge markers) using only natural light or the vehicle lighting systems. At night, visibility is the ability to determine the identity, direction of travel, and rate of travel of observed light sources at the distances indicated. German law (50/50 Law) states that if visibility is reduced to 50 meters (164 feet) or less, the maximum speed limit is 50 kilometers (30 miles) per hour.


H-10. TEMPERATURES
Temperatures are used to determine the likelihood for observed conditions to stay the same, improve, or get worse.

 

APPENDIX I
ARMY IN EUROPE MILITARY-VEHICLE CONSPICUITY PROGRAM


I-1. PURPOSE
This appendix explains how to use military vehicle delineators (MVDs). Use of MVDs help prevent rear-end collisions by making military vehicles conspicuous.


I-2. APPLICATION
The policy in this appendix applies to every tactical tracked, wheeled, and trailer vehicle in the Army in Europe. Only the retroreflective markings specified this appendix may be used on the rear of vehicles operating in the Army in Europe.


I-3. REQUIREMENTS


I-4. MVD DESCRIPTION


I-5. ORDERING
MVDs and military vehicle delineator plates (MVDPs) are in the supply system and can be ordered by using the information in table I-1.


Table I-1
Ordering Information
NSN Description
9390-01-382-8308Item: SHEETING, REFLECTIVE
Description: (MVD) 25 each 7.87-in square red/yellow delineator, self adhesive, no backing plate
9390-01-382-8369Item: SHEETING, REFLECTIVE
Description: (MVD) 25 each 15.75-in square red/yellow delineator, self adhesive, no backing plate
9390-01-382-8325Item: SHEETING, REFLECTIVE
Description: (MVDP) 25 each 7.87-in square red/yellow delineator, self adhesive, mounted on a polycarbonate backing plate
9390-01-382-8460Item: SHEETING, REFLECTIVE
Description: (MVDP) 25 each 15.75-in square red/yellow delineator, self adhesive, mounted on a polycarbonate backing plate


I-6. PLACEMENT
Specific placement locations for the more common Army tactical vehicles are shown in figure I-1.


I-7. MAINTENANCE
Delineators and other vehicle reflective systems must be cleaned with clear water before vehicles depart an installation or encampment. Vehicle maintenance rest-stop instructions to drivers of tactical wheeled and tracked vehicles must include a requirement to wipe dirt and mud from delineators and other lighting and reflective devices.


 

MVD Description and Mounting Instructions

1. Apply MVDs to the rear of the vehicle only.

2. When viewing the vehicle or trailer from the rear, choose mounting locations no more than 6.5 ft (2 m) from the ground, as close as possible to the outside edges of the vehicle, and as vertical as possible.

3. When viewed from the rear, the outside corner of the yellow reflective portion of the MVD always points down and outward, as shown below.

4. The standard (large) MVD size is 15.75-in square. When it is impossible to apply MVDs that size, 7.87-in (small) square decals or plates may be used.


 

Figure I-1. MVD Description and Mounting Instructions

 

GLOSSARY


ACVArmy combat vehicle
AEArmy in Europe
AMVArmy motor vehicle
ARArmy regulation
CG, USAREUR/7A   Commanding General, United States Army, Europe, and Seventh Army
cmcentimeters
CVCcombat vehicle crewman
DADepartment of the Army
DACDepartment of the Army civilian
DPWdirector of public works
DUIdriving under the influence
DWIdriving while intoxicated
FMfield manual
ftfeet
FYfiscal year
HAZMAThazardous material
HQ USAREUR/7AHeadquarters, United States Army, Europe, and Seventh Army
HQDAHeadquarters, Department of the Army
ininches
LNlocal national
mmeters
MCSmilitary conspicuity stripe
MHEmaterials handling equipment
MOPPmission-oriented protective posture
MVDmilitary vehicle delineator
MVDPmilitary vehicle delineator plate
NCOnoncommissioned officer
NCOICnoncommissioned officer in charge
NMCnot mission capable
NSNnational stock number
OFoptional form
POVprivately owned vehicle
RAWLrotating amber warning light
SAAspecial achievement award
SFstandard form
SOPstanding operating procedure
TCtrack commander
TEVtrail escort vehicle
U.S.United States
USAREURUnited States Army, Europe
WDOwinter driving orientation