Headquarters
United States Army Europe
Wiesbaden, Germany

Headquarters
United States Army Installation Management Command,
    Europe Region
Sembach, Germany

Army in Europe
Regulation 190-13*

4 February 2014

Military Police

USAREUR Physical Security Program


*This regulation supersedes AE Regulation 190-13, 23 October 2003.



For the Commander:

JAMES B. MINGO
Colonel, GS
Chief of Staff

Official:

DWAYNE J. VIERGUTZ
Chief, Army in Europe
    Document Management



Summary. This regulation—

  • Establishes the USAREUR and IMCOM-Europe Physical Security Program. This program is part of the Antiterrorism/Force Protection Program, G34 Protect Directorate, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G3/5/7, HQ USAREUR.

  • Provides supplemental guidance to Department of the Army physical security publications.

  • Must be used with AR 190-5, AR 190-11, AR 190-13, AR 190-14, AR 190-16, AR 190-51, DA Pamphlet 190-51, AE Regulation 190-16, and AE Regulation 525-13.
  • Summary of Change. This revision completely revises the previous edition of the regulation.

    Applicability. This regulation applies to USAREUR major subordinate and specialized commands (AE Reg 10-5, app A) (including U.S. Army tenant units in USEUCOM that are subject to local requirements) and IMCOM-Europe.

    Records Management. Records created as a result of processes prescribed by this regulation must be identified, maintained, and disposed of according to AR 25-400-2. Record titles and descriptions are on the Army Records Information Management System website at https://www.arims.army.mil.

    Supplementation. Commanders will not supplement this regulation without approval of the Provost Marshal Division (PMD), G34 Protect Directorate, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G3/5/7, HQ USAREUR (AEOP-PDP-SO).

    Forms. This regulation prescribes AE Form 190-13H(G), AE Form 190-13H(I), AE Form 190-13I, and AE Form 190-13L. AE and higher level forms are available through the Army in Europe Library & Publishing System (AEPUBS) at https://aepubs.army.mil/.

    Suggested Improvements. The proponent of this regulation is the PMD, G34 Protect Directorate, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G3/5/7, HQ USAREUR (AEOP-PDP-SO). Users may suggest improvements to this regulation by sending DA Form 2028 to the PMD (AEOP-PDP-SO), Unit 29351, APO AE 09014-9351.



    CONTENTS


    CHAPTER 1
    INTRODUCTION


    CHAPTER 2
    USAREUR PHYSICAL SECURITY PROGRAM


    CHAPTER 3
    SECURITY OF ARMS, AMMUNITION, AND EXPLOSIVES (AA&E)


    CHAPTER 4
    ACCESS CONTROL


    CHAPTER 5
    SECURITY OF ARMY PROPERTY AT UNIT AND INSTALLATION LEVEL


    CHAPTER 6
    PHYSICAL SECURITY EQUIPMENT (PSE)


    CHAPTER 7
    USAREUR CONTRACT GUARD PROGRAM


    CHAPTER 8
    USAREUR G34 STAFF ASSESSMENT VISIT (SAV) PROGRAM


    CHAPTER 9
    USAREUR SECURITY EQUIPMENT WORKING GROUP (SEWG)


    Appendixes
    A. References
    B. Guidelines for Developing Installation Barrier Plans
    C. Sample Format for Unit Physical Security Standing Operating Procedure


    Figures
    3-1. Request for Medical Records Check
    3-2. Request for Personnel Records Check
    3-3. Request for DES/PM or Security Office Records Check
    3-4. Sample Arms Room Unaccompanied-Access Roster
    3-5. Format of Appointment Memorandum for Record for Primary or Alternate AA&E Key Custodian
    3-6. Bilateral Storage Agreement for Consolidated Arms Room
    6-1. Format for Requesting Non-Army or Non-USAREUR Standard ESS
    B-1. Sample Matrix
    B-2. Sample Drawing Showing Number and Type of Barriers


    Glossary



    CHAPTER 1
    INTRODUCTION


    1-1. PURPOSE
    This regulation—


    1-2. REFERENCES
    Appendix A lists references.


    1-3. EXPLANATION OF ABBREVIATIONS
    The glossary defines abbreviations.


    1-4. RESPONSIBILITIES
    Commanders have an inherent PS responsibility for their commands. This responsibility will not be delegated or transferred, except by official orders.


    CHAPTER 2
    USAREUR PHYSICAL SECURITY PROGRAM


    2-1. GENERAL
    PS is a critical part of the USAREUR Force Protection Program. PS measures are designed to detect, deter, delay, and defend against threats to the U.S. Forces. PS measures are a combination of active and passive systems, devices, and security personnel. Measures may be physical (for example, barriers, fences, lights, walls), electronic (for example, alarms, cameras, electronic entry/access control systems (EECSs)), and procedural (for example, inspections and surveys, property inventory and accountability procedures, security checks, security training and awareness programs). A successful PS program cannot be achieved without appropriate command emphasis and the cooperation of every element of a commander’s staff. PS personnel must be fully engaged in and remain active participants in the USAREUR PS Program. This chapter—


    2-2. THREAT ASSESSMENT
    PS programs must be tailored to meet local needs. A key element of this process is assessing the local threat. Installations and their equivalents will develop a local threat statement. This statement will identify local threats and make full use of investigative resources available in the geographic area to anticipate criminal and intelligence activities that threaten the security of U.S. Forces property and personnel. The PS threat assessment will be taken from the overall force protection (FP) threat statement. The local threat statement must be included in the installation PS plan.


    2-3. PHYSICAL SECURITY PLANNING


    2-4. PHYSICAL SECURITY PLAN


    2-5. STANDING OPERATING PROCEDURES
    SOPs will address unique security requirements and procedures. Unit commanders and heads of activities must approve SOPs before they can be implemented. Appendix C provides a sample format for unit PS SOPs.


    2-6. MISSION-ESSENTIAL VULNERABILITY AREAS
    MEVAs consist of equipment, property, and facilities that have been recommended by the DES/PM and approved by the garrison commander as requiring additional protection through the application of increased PS measures, procedures, and equipment. A list of mandatory sites that are required to be designated as MEVAs is in AR 190-13, chapter 2-7.


    2-7. RESTRICTED AREAS
    A restricted area is an area or facility that is either required by regulation or identified by the commander as requiring additional security and access controls to restrict access to classified information and other DOD assets.


    2-8. PHYSICAL SECURITY SURVEYS
    PS surveys will be conducted in accordance with guidance in AR 190-13, chapter 2, paragraph 2-14, and this regulation.


    2-9. PHYSICAL SECURITY INSPECTIONS


    2-10. REPORTS OF CORRECTIVE ACTION
    Reports of corrective action will be provided to recipients identified in AR 190-13, chapter 2, paragraph 2-15 e(1) through (3).


    2-11. REPORT CLASSIFICATION
    The results of a survey, inspection, or assessment often identify critical deficiencies or vulnerabilities in an installation or facility PS program. Therefore, the reports will be classified according to AR 190-13, paragraph 2-17. Reports of completed inspections or surveys will be classified and safeguarded according to DOD 5200.1-R and AR 380-5, as appropriate.


    2-12. SECURITY CRITERIA DEVIATION PROCESS
    Requests for waivers and exceptions to PS requirements will be—


    2-13. SECURITY ENGINEERING SURVEYS


    2-14. NEW CONSTRUCTION AND MAJOR RENOVATIONS
    Commanders must ensure that every aspect of PS structural design is incorporated into the initial planning or renovation of facilities. PSOs are required to review and authenticate all copies of DD Form 1391 certifying that PS considerations have been thoroughly reviewed and are integrated into the proposed construction as applicable to the USAG. The PSO will maintain close liaison with installation engineers for early coordination of proposed new construction projects. The PSO should be an active voting member on the installation planning board.


    2-15. PHYSICAL SECURITY CREDENTIALS


    2-16. USAREUR PHYSICAL SECURITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
    The PMD developed a web-based PSMS to facilitate oversight of the USAREUR PS Program and to reduce paperwork. The USAREUR PSMS is located on the PMD website at https://intranet.eur.army.mil/hq/g34/pmd/sitepages/home.aspx. Commanders of units and activities will provide a copy of all PS inspections and surveys to their higher headquarters PSO. The higher headquarters PSO is responsible for uploading required inspections, assessments, surveys, appointment orders, MEVA lists, and deviations into PSMS. Disposition of web-based files must be completed in accordance with AR 25400-2.


    CHAPTER 3
    SECURITY OF ARMS, AMMUNITION, AND EXPLOSIVES (AA&E)


    3-1. PURPOSE
    This chapter—


    3-2. GENERAL


    3-3. ACCESS CONTROL ROSTERS


     

     

    Figure 3-1. Request for Medical Records Check



     

     

    Figure 3-2. Request for Personnel Records Check



     

     

    Figure 3-3. Request for DES/PM or Security Office Records Check


    3-4. KEY-AND-LOCK CONTROL OF AA&E


    3-5. STORAGE FACILITIES
    Procedures for operating a consolidated arms room are outlined in AR 190-11, chapter 4, paragraph 4-4. Procedures will also be outlined and included in the memorandum of understanding between both commanders (fig 3-6).


    3-6. ARMED GUARD REQUIREMENTS


    3-7. ELECTRONIC SECURITY SYSTEM (ESS)
    ESSs must meet the requirements of AR 190-11, chapter 3, and AR 190-13, chapter 9. ESS purchase and installation must first be approved by the PMD. Because an ESS is nonstandard PS equipment, commanders are not authorized to purchase or install an ESS without prior coordination and approval by the PMD.


    3-8. STORAGE AND SUPPLEMENTAL CONTROLS AR 190-11, chapter 4, section 2, provides additional requirements for all categories of AA&E storage and supplemental controls.


    3-9. CONTROL OF WEAPONS AR 190-11, chapter 4, provides guidance on the control of weapons.


    3-10. ARMED-GUARD REQUIREMENTS
    AR 190-11, chapter 5, provides guidance on the protection of missiles, rockets, ammunition, and explosives at unit level.


    3-11. WEAPONS AND AMMUNITION INVENTORIES


    3-12. REPORTING MISSING OR RECOVERED AA&E
    When AA&E is lost, missing, stolen, or recovered, the USAG DES/PM or designated representatives will immediately complete a SIR and DA Form 3056 and send copies to the PMD (AEOP-PDP-LE) and the 5th MP Battalion (CID).


    3-13. PRIVATELY OWNED AND COMMERCIAL WEAPONS AND AMMUNITION All personnel subject to the NATO Status of Forces Agreement will comply with the policy outlined in AR 190-11, ALARACT 063/2013, AE Regulation 190-6, and HN laws as applicable.


    3-14. TRAINING Commanders and managers responsible for AA&E will establish a training program for personnel responsible for the security and accountability of these items. Annual refresher training will also be conducted to ensure that all personnel are aware of their responsibilities for controlling and safeguarding AA&E.


    3-15. IN-TRANSIT SECURITY OF AA&E Commanders will ensure that any unit movement of AA&E is done in accordance with the security requirements outlined in paragraph 1-4i of this regulation.


     

     

    Figure 3-4. Sample Arms Room Unaccompanied-Access Roster



     

     

    Figure 3-5. Format of Appointment Memorandum for Record for Primary or Alternate AA&E Key Custodian



     

     

    Figure 3-6. Bilateral Storage Agreement for Consolidated Arms Room


    CHAPTER 4
    ACCESS CONTROL

    AE Regulation 190-16 describes procedures for controlling access to and from U.S. Army installations in the European theater. AE Regulation 525-13 prescribes policy and procedures for physically searching individuals and vehicles. This regulation (AE Reg 190-13) addresses PS issues, but does not apply to restricted areas governed by other regulations.


    4-1. ADDITIONAL ACCESS-CONTROL POINT (ACP) GUIDANCE
    TC 19-210 provides additional guidance and procedures. Commanders should refer to the DOD Technical Support Working Group Vehicle Inspection Checklist as a guide for developing and conducting training on search techniques.


    4-2. INVESTIGATING AND ADJUDICATING ACP INSTALLATION BARRIER INCIDENTS


    CHAPTER 5
    SECURITY OF ARMY PROPERTY AT UNIT AND INSTALLATION LEVEL


    5-1. GENERAL
    AR 190-51 provides guidance for the security of army property at the unit and installation level.


    5-2. COMMUNICATIONS SECURITY (COMSEC) MATERIAL AND CONTROLLED CRYPTOGRAPHIC ITEMS
    AE Regulation 380-40 provides policy and procedures for safeguarding, controlling, and disposing of COMSEC material, controlled cryptographic items, and other secure communications equipment.


    5-3. SECURITY OF U.S. ARMY ISSUED BAYONETS


    CHAPTER 6
    PHYSICAL SECURITY EQUIPMENT (PSE)


    6-1. GENERAL
    In accordance with AR 190-13, chapter 4, and this regulation, PS resources will be used to protect Army assets and capabilities including national security information and materiel. Nonstandard PSE may be used if DOD or DA standardized equipment is not available or does not meet a technical requirement. An operational needs statement will be sent to the United States Army Training and Doctrine Command user representative when DOD- or DA-standardized equipment needs to be developed. Once a component or system is developed or adopted from commercial sources, it is considered standardized and may be adopted by all DOD components to meet joint operational requirements. ESSs are not routine requirements for Army facilities or areas, but rather for assets when specifically prescribed by policy.


    6-2. PROGRAM MANAGEMENT
    USAG DES/PMs will help commanders and tenant activities identify and develop PSE and ESS projects to meet requirements, establish standards, and ensure compatibility with existing systems. In coordination with the USAG DPW, the USAG DES/PM will track and maintain data on intrusion-detection systems and other ESSs in his or her AOR.


     

     

    Figure 6-1. Format for Requesting a Non-Army or Non-USAREUR-Standard ESS


    6-3. CLOSED-CIRCUIT TELEVISION (CCTV)


    6-4. ELECTRONIC ENTRY/ACCESS CONTROL SYSTEMS
    Specifications for constructing EECSs are outlined in the Corps of Engineers Guide Specification 13720. The requirement for using EECSs to control access to classified information is described in AR 380-5, chapter 7. AR 600-8-14 also provides guidance on EECSs. All—


    6-5. ESS PERSONAL IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS
    Personal identification numbers (PINs)—


    6-6. MAINTENANCE OF ESS


    6-7. PERSONNEL SUITABILITY AND RELIABILITY CHECKS


    6-8. MOVEMENT OF ESS COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMS
    ESSs will not be activated, deactivated, or moved without written prior notification and approval from the IMCOM-Europe PSO (IMEU-OPD-PS).


    6-9. ESS INSPECTIONS
    The checklist located in the SOAB Automated Physical Security Management Portal must be used for ESS inspections.


    6-10. RESPONSE TO ALARMS


    CHAPTER 7
    USAREUR CONTRACT GUARD PROGRAM

    Questions and concerns regarding the USAREUR Contract Guard Program may be sent to the Contract Guard Program Manager, COR, Emergency Services Branch, IMCOM-Europe (IMEU-OPD-S).


    CHAPTER 8
    USAREUR G34 STAFF ASSESSMENT VISIT (SAV) PROGRAM


    8-1. PURPOSE
    This chapter prescribes policy and assigns responsibility for developing and maintaining practical, economical, and effective SAV programs. SAV programs will be used to identify, document, and report installations or activities that require special PS or contract guard considerations because of their mission-essential, critical status and vulnerability to—


    8-2. SECURITY OPERATIONS AND ASSESSMENTS BRANCH
    The SOAB is responsible for overall PS policy and programs in the European theater based on an analysis of the mission and known or anticipated requirements and threats. This responsibility extends to contingency operations and missions throughout the European theater.


    8-3. OPERATIONAL INSPECTION AND SAV PROGRAMS
    IMCOM-Europe will establish and execute a command organizational inspection program (OIP) and an SAV program to monitor the adequacy of PS program implementation and requirements at USAGs. Each USAG will be inspected at least once every 24 months or more frequently as determined by the Director, IMCOM-Europe. Inspections may be more frequent as a result of findings noted during other PS and command inspections and surveys or because of a change in operational requirements or the threat condition. Inspection schedules should be established and coordinated with the garrison to be inspected at least 6 months before the inspection.


    8-4. PHYSCIAL SECURITY INSPECTION AND SAV
    The SOAB is responsible for conducting SAVs and participating in command OIPs that specifically address the USAREUR PS Program. This is in addition to PS inspections required by AR 190-11, AR 190-13, and AR 190-16. Only personnel who have received training from the H3 Physical Security School will conduct SAVs. An outbriefing will be given to the commander of the unit after the SAV. Findings will be posted by PSOs and PSIs on the USAREUR G34 SharePoint portal website at https://intranet.eur.army.mil/hq/g34/pmd/sitepages/home.aspx.


    8-5. USAREUR CONTRACT GUARD SAV
    The SOAB is responsible for conducting SAVs specifically addressing the USAREUR Contract Guard Program. The intent of the contract guard SAV is to identify program discrepancies within contract guard programs. The SOAB staff conducting SAVs will also identify contractual discrepancies and report all findings to the IMCOM-Europe Contract Guard COR and the Chief, SOAB.


    8-6. REQUIRED SAV ACTIONS (PHYSICAL SECURITY)
    During SAVs, the SOAB representative will check the PS plan by referring to AR 190-13, appendix B, and its appendixes. In addition, PS plans must address the following appendixes listed in AR 190-13:


    8-7. REQUIRED SAV ACTIONS (CONTRACT GUARD PROGRAM)
    During SAVs, the SOAB representative will check overall compliance with the current contract describing the USAREUR Contract Guard Program.


    CHAPTER 9
    USAREUR SECURITY EQUIPMENT WORKING GROUP (SEWG)


    9-1. GENERAL
    This chapter outlines responsibilities and provides guidance for the procurement of nonstandard, commercial FP/PS equipment. In addition, it provides policy guidance and procedures for the SEWG.


    9-2. POLICY


    9-3. DEFINITION OF NONSTANDARD EQUIPMENT
    Nonstandard security equipment is any equipment not procured or available through the U.S. Army supply system. AR 190-13 prohibits commanders below those who command Army commands, Army service component commands (for example, USAREUR), and direct reporting units from approving requests to purchase, issue, replace, lease, or renew leases for nonstandard PSE such as mass notifications systems, vehicle inspection equipment, and vehicle tracking systems and devices.


    9-4. SEWG RESPONSIBILITIES


    9-5. PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

     

    APPENDIX A
    REFERENCES


    SECTION I
    PUBLICATIONS

    Defense Transportation Regulations 4500.9-R, Part II, Cargo Movement

    United States Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, May 12, subject: Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices

    DOD 5200.1-R, Information Security Program

    DOD Manual 5100.76, Physical Security of Sensitive Conventional Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives (AA&E)

    DOD Vulnerability Assessment Benchmarks, 1 January 2013

    DOD Technical Support Working Group Vehicle Inspection Checklist, 23 October 2000

    AR 25-400-2, The Army Records Information Management System (ARIMS)

    AR 190-5, Motor Vehicle Traffic Supervision

    AR 190-11, Physical Security of Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives

    AR 190-13, The Army Physical Security Program

    AR 190-14, Carrying of Firearms and Use of Force for Law Enforcement and Security Duties

    AR 190-16, Physical Security

    AR 190-45, Law Enforcement Reporting

    AR 190-51, Security of Unclassified Army Property (Sensitive and Nonsensitive)

    AR 380-5, Department of the Army Information Security Program

    AR 380-67, Personnel Security Program

    AR 385-10, The Army Safety Program

    AR 420-1, Army Facilities Management

    AR 600-8-14, Identification Cards for Members of the Uniformed Services, Their Eligible Family Members, and Other Eligible Personnel

    AR 710-2, Supply Policy Below the National Level

    DA Pamphlet 190-51, Risk Analysis for Army Property

    DA Pamphlet 385-64, Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards

    DA Pamphlet 710-2-1, Using Unit Supply System (Manual Procedures)

    ALARACT Message 063/2013, March 2013, subject: Control and Reporting of Privately Owned Weapons

    USEUCOM OPORD 11-05, HQ EUCOM Antiterrorism Operations Order

    United States Army Corps of Engineers, May 2004, subject: Army Installation Design Standards

    United States Army Corps of Engineers, January 2009, subject: Army Access Control Point Standard and Design/Criteria

    Corps of Engineers Guide Specification 13720, Electronic Security System

    Technical Manual 5-807-10, Signage

    Technical Manual 5-853-4, Security Engineering Electronic Security Systems

    Training Circular 19-210, Access Control Handbook

    AE Regulation 10-5, Headquarters, United States Army Europe

    AE Regulation 55-4, Safe Movement of Hazardous Goods by Surface Modes

    AE Regulation 190-6, Registration and Control of Privately Owned Firearms and Other Weapons in Germany

    AE Regulation 190-16, Installation Access Control

    AE Regulation 380-40, Safeguarding and Controlling Communications Security Material

    AE Regulation 525-13, Antiterrorism

    AE Regulation 604-1, Local National Screening Program in Germany

    USAREUR OPORD 0040-13, General Officer for Force Protection (GOFP) Designations

    USAREUR TASKORD 12-0260, Transportation Security Measures for Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives

    USAREUR GENADMIN Message No. 1205094, Security, Storage, and Transportation of Category I and II Ammunition


    SECTION II
    FORMS

    DD Form 1391, FY_ _ Military Construction Project Data

    DA Form 2028, Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms

    DA Form 2806-1, Physical Security Inspection Report

    DA Form 3056, Report of Missing/Recovered Firearms, Ammunition and Explosives

    DA Form 4283, Facilities Engineering Work Request

    DA Form 5513, Key Control Register and Inventory

    DA Form 7281, Command Oriented Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives (AA&E) Security Screening and Evaluation Record

    AE Form 190-13H(G), Personnel/Vehicle Record of Admission

    AE Form 190-13H(I), Personnel/Vehicle Record of Admission

    AE Form 190-13I, Issue of Weapon and Ammunition

    AE Form 190-13L, Request for Waiver or Exception of Physical Security Requirements

    AE Form 190-45D, Military Police Record Check

    AE Form 525-13A, Army in Europe Bomb Threat Telephone Guide

     



    APPENDIX B
    GUIDELINES FOR DEVELOPING INSTALLATION BARRIER PLANS


    B-1. GENERAL
    Barrier plans are part of the overall antiterrorism plan evaluated during joint services integrated vulnerability assessments (JSIVAs) by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). Barrier plans consider the threat from stationary (parked) and moving vehicles. Barriers may be used to restrict parking, redirect traffic, or both. These guidelines will help installations develop and execute effective barrier plans for various threat conditions.


    B-2. OBJECTIVE
    The objective of a barrier plan is to provide orderly and timely security to U.S. Forces, their tenants, and all U.S. property. A clear, detailed, and rehearsed plan should reduce the manpower and time needed to execute force-protection requirements while maintaining a safe environment as the force protection condition (FPCON) increases.


    B-3. REFERENCES


    B-4. BARRIER PLAN ELEMENTS
    A clear and detailed barrier plan identifies the needs, resources, and associated actions, for securing the perimeters of installations and any other local U.S. military facilities under the operational control of the installation commander. Until necessary construction projects are completed, the barrier plan should provide for temporary barrier placement. The barrier plan should meet the intent and standards described in the DOD Vulnerability Assessment Benchmarks, direct various units and activities to take specific actions, and include the following subjects:


    B-5. RECOMMENDATIONS


     

     

    Figure B-1. Sample Matrix


    B-6. USACE ACCESS-CONTROL POINT BARRIERS
    The use of vehicle barriers can greatly enhance a commander’s force protection posture. Careful consideration must be given to the planning and installation of barriers. Figure B-2 is a sample drawing showing the use of different types of barriers. The DOD Anti-Ram Vehicle Barriers List provides more information (https://pdc.usace.army.mil/library/BarrierCertification).


     

     

    Figure B-2. Sample Drawing Showing Number and Type of Barriers

     

    APPENDIX C
    SAMPLE FORMAT FOR PHYSICAL SECURITY STANDING OPERATING PROCEDURE


    This appendix provides a sample format that commanders may follow when creating their physical security (PS) standing operating procedure (SOP). The SOP will apply only to those personnel under the supervision of the person signing the SOP.


     

     


    1. PURPOSE
    This SOP establishes responsibilities and procedures for safeguarding arms, ammunition, explosives AA&E); supplies; equipment; and personnel of unit or activity name.


    2. REFERENCES


    3. APPLICABILITY
    The provisions of this SOP apply to all personnel and units assigned or attached to unit or activity name or residing on installation name.


    4. RESPONSIBILITIES


    5. ANNEXES
    Procedures and responsibilities for each function are indicated as follows:


    ANNEX A
    AA&E


    1. References. List applicable references, such as regulations, field manuals, and other documents relating to the security of AA&E.

    2. Purpose. This annex establishes the responsibilities, standards, and procedures for securing AA&E in the unit or activity name.

    3. Applicability. This annex applies to all personnel assigned or attached to the unit or activity name.

    4. Responsibilities. Specify the duties and responsibilities of the PSO or representative, first sergeant, supply sergeant, armorer, and other personnel relating to the security, issue, and turn-in of AA&E, as applicable.

    5. Procedures. Specify the manner in which weapons and ammunition will be stored in racks, containers, or cabinets in the arms room. Indicate key-and-lock control procedures for arms-room keys and all inventory procedures required by regulation. Briefly describe access-control procedures and the requirements for background checks for all personnel authorized unaccompanied access to the arms room by the commander. Briefly address ammunition management procedures or refer those personnel to DA Pamphlet 710-2-1, chapter 11.

    6. Issue and Turn-In Procedures. Specify the procedures used by the unit or activity to issue and turn-in all weapons (AE Form 190-13I), both individual and crew-served.

    7. Inspections and Inventories. Specify which inspections of arms security will be conducted, the frequency and type of inventories that must be completed, and the procedures to follow for recording the results of the inspection and inventories.

    8. Formats and Forms. Attach locally formatted samples of the forms required to accomplish all tasks or refer to those in this regulation.


    ANNEX B
    SECURITY OF PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT


    1. References. List applicable references such as AR 190-51, AR 710-2, DA Pamphlet 710-2-1, and AE Regulation 190-13.

    2. Purpose. This annex establishes the responsibilities, standards, and procedures for safeguarding property and equipment in the unit or activity name.

    3. Applicability. This annex applies to all personnel assigned or attached to the unit or activity name.

    4. Responsibilities. Designate the duties and responsibilities of the PSO or representative, unit supply sergeant, and other personnel with respect to the security of property and equipment to ensure duties and procedures outlined are specifically identified, if applicable.

    5. Procedures. Follow the risk-analysis procedures in DA Pamphlet 190-51 with assistance from the servicing United States Army garrison (USAG) PSO or applicable agency to determine the level of risk assigned to a facility. Make use of the USAG’s services to help fulfill this requirement. When the level of risk is known, adhere to the protective and procedural measures in AR 190-51. The SOP need only refer to AR 190-51, chapter 3, for personnel to determine the protective and procedural standards associated with each category of property and equipment.


    ANNEX C
    KEY-AND-LOCK CONTROL


    1. References. List applicable references, such as AR 190-11, AR 190-51, and AE Regulation 190-13.

    2. Purpose. This annex establishes the responsibilities, standards, and procedures for identification and control of all locks, keys, and combinations used in the security of AA&E, property, and equipment. Use chapters 3 and 5 of this regulation to develop this annex.

    3. Applicability. This annex applies to all personnel assigned or attached to the unit or activity name.

    4. Responsibilities. Specify the responsibilities of the PSO and key/lock primary and alternate custodians, and ensure that the specific functions described in chapters 3 and 5 of this regulation are addressed.

    5. Procedures. Describe how the PSO or representative and key custodian will be appointed and how storage facilities and containers will be identified for controlled locking devices. Describe how the locking devices will be identified for inclusion in the control system and how individual Soldiers will be authorized issue of keys, locks, and combinations. Include information on the temporary issue of keys, those used for personal retention by limited individuals, and the type of containers where the key custodian will secure the locks, keys, or combinations in their custody.


    ANNEX D
    EMERGENCY EVACUATION OF ARMS AND AMMUNITION


    1. References. List applicable references, such as AR 190-11 and AE Regulation 190-13.

    2. Purpose. This annex establishes the responsibilities, standards, and procedures for the emergency evacuation of arms and ammunition to a secure location in the event of a threat to the security of the arms and ammunition.

    3. Applicability. This annex applies to all personnel assigned or attached to the unit or activity name.

    4. Responsibilities. Specify the duties of the PSO or representative, civilian personnel, and unit personnel responsible for the emergency evacuation of weapons and ammunition.

    5. Procedures. Identify the conditions for the emergency removal of arms and ammunition, the manner of removal, the security precautions to be used during the transportation of the arms and ammunition, the location to which the arms and ammunition will be taken, the routes to be used, and which inventory and inspection procedures to initiate to ensure that all arms and ammunition are properly accounted for during and after the evacuation.

    6. Test. The personnel responsible for implementation must test these procedures and record the results. Testing personnel will help correct weaknesses or forward a list of weaknesses, if necessary, to higher command levels for help with resolving them. Normally, tests are conducted without moving the arms or ammunition.


    ANNEX E
    ELECTRONIC SECURITY SYSTEM (ESS)


    1. References. List applicable references such as AR 190-11, AR 190-13, and AE Regulation 190-13.

    2. Purpose. This annex establishes the responsibilities, standards, and procedures for the operation of the IDS in the unit or activity name arms room.

    3. Applicability. This annex applies to all personnel assigned or attached to the unit or activity name.

    4. Responsibilities. Specify the responsibilities of the PSO or representative, supply sergeant, key custodian, and civilian personnel with respect to the control and operation of the ESS.

    5. Procedures. Specify the procedures to be used by unit personnel for the placement of warning signs, operation of the ESS, control of ESS keys, inspections, checks, and tests of the ESS, and the documentation of such inspections, checks, and tests, both by unit personnel and the agency monitoring the system. Also identify what the unit personnel must do if the ESS alarm fails (armed-guard requirements, relocation of weapons).

    6. Forms and Formats. See chapters 2, 3, and 5 for samples of support documentation.


    ANNEX F
    BOMB THREAT


    1. References. List applicable references such as AR 190-13 and AE Regulation 190-13.

    2. Purpose. This annex establishes the responsibilities, standards, and procedures to be used in the event of a bomb threat against the unit or activity name.

    3. Applicability. This annex applies to all personnel attached or assigned to the unit or activity name.

    4. Responsibilities. Specify the duties and responsibilities of the PSO, civilian personnel, and unit personnel regarding bomb threats.

    5. Procedures. Specify the duties and responsibilities of the PSO or representative, civilian personnel, and unit personnel regarding bomb threats.

    6. Forms and Formats. Use AE Form 525-13A for telephonic threats. These cards may be ordered through normal publication channels.

    7. Serious Incident Reports (SIRs). Meet the SIR requirements in AR 190-45 and in local command procedures.


    ANNEX G
    IN-TRANSIT SECURITY OF AA&E, PROPERTY, AND EQUIPMENT


    1. References. List applicable references such as AR 190-11, DA Pamphlet 710-2-1, AE Regulation 554, and AE Regulation 190-13.

    2. Purpose. This annex establishes the responsibilities, standards, and procedures to be used to secure AA&E, property, and equipment during transportation.

    3. Applicability. This annex applies to all personnel assigned or attached to the unit or activity name.

    4. Responsibilities. Specify the duties and responsibilities of the PSO or representative, unit supply sergeant, armorer, civilian personnel, and convoy commander with respect to the security of AA&E, property, and equipment while in transit.

    5. Procedures. Specify the vehicles in which AA&E, property, and equipment may be transported, the specific type of equipment, arms, or ammunition requiring security during transit, the requirement for armed guards (if applicable), the types and number of locks required to secure the equipment, the number of personnel and their grade needed to accomplish the mission, and inventory and accountability procedures to be used from start to completion of the mission.


    ANNEX H
    SECURITY OF ARMS, AMMUNITION, PROPERTY, AND EQUIPMENT IN A FIELD ENVIRONMENT


    1. References. List applicable regulations such as AR 190-11, DA Pamphlet 710-2-1, and AE Regulation 190-13.

    2. Purpose. This annex establishes the responsibilities, standards, and procedures for securing arms, ammunition, property, and equipment in a field environment.

    3. Applicability. This annex applies to all personnel assigned or attached to the unit or activity name.

    4. Responsibilities. Specify the duties and responsibilities of the unit PSO or representative, first sergeant, armorer, key custodian, civilian personnel, and individual Soldiers for securing arms, ammunition, property, and equipment in a field environment.

    5. Procedures. Specify the procedures to be used for securing arms, ammunition, property, and equipment while in a controlled, consolidated location when issued to the individual Soldier. Make specific reference to the manner by which the individual Soldier is expected to secure his or her weapon and ammunition. Develop separate inventory and key-and-lock procedures for the field environment.


     

    GLOSSARY


    21st TSC21st Theater Sustainment Command
    AA&Earms, ammunition, and explosives
    ACoSassistant chief of staff
    ACPaccess-control point
    AEArmy in Europe
    AEPUBSArmy in Europe Library & Publishing System
    ALARACTall Army activities
    AORarea of responsibility
    APSEAGArmy Physical Security Equipment Action Group
    ARArmy regulation
    AT/FPantiterrorism/force protection
    ATWGantiterrorism working group
    CCTVclosed-circuit television
    CG, USAREURCommanding General, United States Army Europe
    COECenter of Expertise
    COMSECcommunications security
    CORcontracting officer’s representative
    DADepartment of the Army
    DESdirector(ate) of emergency services
    DES/PMdirector of emergency services/provost marshal
    DODDepartment of Defense
    DOLdirector of logistics
    DPWdirector of public works
    DTBdesign threat basis
    DTRADefense Threat Reduction Agency
    EECSelectronic entry/access control system
    ESSelectronic security system
    FPforce protection
    FPCONforce protection condition
    G1Office of the G1, Headquarters, United States Army Europe
    G2Deputy Chief of Staff, G2, United States Army Europe
    G3/5/7Deputy Chief of Staff, G3, United States Army Europe
    G6Deputy Chief of Staff, G6, United States Army Europe
    G8Deputy Chief of Staff, G8, United States Army Europe
    GENADMINgeneral administration
    HDThigh-density target
    HQDAHeadquarters, Department of the Army
    HQ USAREURHeadquarters, United States Army Europe
    HRPhigh-risk personnel
    HRThigh-risk target
    HVThigh-value target
    IACPinstallation access control point
    IACSInstallation Access Control System
    IDSintrusion-detection system
    IMCOM-EuropeUnited States Army Installation Management Command, Europe Region
    ISinformation system
    MEVAmission-essential vulnerable area
    MPmilitary police
    NCOnoncommissioned officer
    OIPorganizational inspection program
    OPORDoperation order
    PINpersonal identification number
    PMProvost Marshal, United States Army Europe
    PMDProvost Marshal Division, G34 Protect Directorate, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G3, Headquarters, United States Army Europe
    PM-FPSProduct Manager-Force Protection Systems
    POCpoint of contact
    PSphysical security
    PSEphysical security equipment
    PSIphysical security inspection
    PSMSPhysical Security Management System
    PSOphysical security officer
    PSVApersonal security vulnerability assessment
    PWSperformance work statement
    SAVstaff assessment visit
    SCORsite contracting officer’s representative
    SEWGUnited States Army Europe Security Equipment Working Group
    SIRserious incident report
    SMSSecurity Management System
    SOABSecurity Operations and Assessments Branch, Provost Marshal Division, G34 Protect Directorate, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G3/5/7, Headquarters, United States Army Europe
    SOPstanding operating procedure
    TASKORDtasking order
    TNTtrinitrotoluene
    U.S.United States
    USACEUnited States Army Corps of Engineers
    USACIDCUnited States Army Criminal Investigation Command
    USAGUnited States Army garrison
    USAINSCOMUnited States Army Intelligence and Security Command
    USAREURUnited States Army Europe
    USAREUR G34G34 Protect Directorate, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G3/5/7, Headquarters, United States Army Europe
    USEUCOMUnited States European Command